#hooked How Social Networking Changed Me

0 Flares 0 Flares ×

Back when windows were on houses and  we ate apples, wasn’t life a bit easier? Don’t get me wrong, social networking is a huge part of my life, but it has changed me.

Sure, social networking introduced me to great people (like Jen) and helps me keep in contact with friends across the world. But, has it got me hooked to the point I can’t give it up? Maybe. This past week, I’ve been on vacation at my in-laws with limited cell phone coverage. I have not been able to just check Facebook and Twitter on the regular like I am used to. Is it killing me? No. Hurting? Maybe a little.

Our house is full of ways to “stay connected”–laptops, iPad, Kindle, smart phones–we are all together as a family this week, yet half the time someone is typing away or zoned out catching up on the latest Olympic news. It is entirely possible that we’ve become hooked on technology, a true issue facing families today.

Dr. Gregory L. Jantz, a best-selling author and founder of The Center for Counseling and Health Resources, Inc. recently released #hooked: The pitfalls of media, technology, and social networking, a telling book of how our society has become reliant on social networks. he speaks frankly about how our technologies can be positive but also have a negative impact on our world, interweaving real-life examples and subtle biblical applications to his words. (And yes, I linked Dr. Jantz’ Twitter up there–go follow!)

While at first I was afraid it would be hard for me to drop my Kindle and Droid and actually read a (gasp!) real life book, I quickly became “hooked” on the text. Perhaps it was because I was realizing how my family sees my constant typing, twittering, tagging, texting…and I wanted to change.

Rather than give you Dr. Jantz‘ tips on how technology can essentially make or break us, I urge you to read the book and see what resonates with you. The telling quotes that I identified with included:

  • “We tend to lock up our houses…but often leave ourselves wide open to other kinds of dangers.” Personally, I am hooked on FourSquare, and until vacationing this week, didn’t really think about my traceable activity. Reading this book, I am much more aware of the dangers of ‘checking in’ on a regular basis (if at all).
  • “Keep your friends as a noun.” Sure, you’ve “friended” me on Facebook, but we haven’t spoken in almost 20 years. Should I feel a positive reaction, or wonder what kept you from answering my letters, phone calls, and visit requests before? This statement really made me consider the “popularity” appeal of social networking.
  • “Your family and friends need honest connection, not 140-character…sound bites.” I crave quick, snap news bits, and have found I do the same in real life, but sitting and listening to a story about the past has all the sudden resurged in meaning for me.
  • “Though I love my computer, I wouldn’t trade a single relationship for it.” Need I say more?
  • “We were made to rest.” How true for me this week. I turned off my work email, knowing Monday is going to hurt, but in the end, I need this rest away from the constant beeps and dings.

#hooked provided so many more connections for me, including activities that made me think about the impact of my social networking, but to tell you all of them would take weeks. I highly suggest this book, even if you think you are not hooked because if nothing else, it will unplug you for a little while–something we all might need every so often.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of #hooked to review and all opinions are 100% my own…including the fact that I enjoyed unplugging for the past few days. You can get your own copy here.

0 Flares Facebook 0 Pin It Share 0 Twitter 0 StumbleUpon 0 Google+ 0 0 Flares ×

Comments

  1. This is so true about being too connected to electronic devices! I am sorry to say that I spend a large part of my day on the computer and other electronic items. The bad thing about this is that I have gained weight! The only way I could lose this weight is to give up some of this computer time! But I am hooked! I need to read this book!

  2. Jessica P. says:

    I definitely feel like I can’t function without my computer and cell phone. Need to know something? Google it. Need to talk to someone? IM them. Need something to pass the time? Browse random things online.(Like PINTEREST! The newest time waster) lol It’s crazy what happens if the power goes out. OMG what do we do?? No tv, no internet!
    I’m nowhere near as bad as a lot of people I know though. I think I’ll always prefer REAL books over an e-reader, I don’t own(or want to own) any kind of smartphone or tablet or whatever new technology is “in” right now. That sounds like a book I’d enjoy reading!:)

  3. Sherrie C. says:

    I really need to read this book. My husband calls my laptop my ‘mistress’ and constantly tells me I’m on it too much. Lately I’ve been taking what he’s been saying to heart and taking a break from social networking, although it’s been difficult…almost painful to do. I realize I might be addicted and need to start stepping away from the computer more often so I can really enjoy all life has to offer, outside of my home.

  4. kelly nicholson says:

    still trying to find myself!

  5. Mike W Davis says:

    Yup! Our house is too, for the shame of it all. I’m a dissabled vet–my wife home schools the kids – so we are here ALL THE TIME–this is the only release I have–except let the dogs out–let the dogs in…The older kids have there lap tops, xboxes, and phones,So to get a break– We go to Church Sunday morning, evening, then Wednesday we volunteer for the Soup Kitchen just to met people. We ,at this house always have some electronic device going–unless we are at church–NO PHONES–not to or from–no one can get ahold of us until we get home. But we still need to make a break from this, so I will be looking into the book–can’t hurt –and Thanks for listening and your reveiw

  6. I was just talking about that the other day to one of my friends. I was born in 65 so I know where I was at when they announced that Elvis died, I know where I was at when my oldest son took his first steps. I also remember the old cameras where we actually had photos that were developed at a photo studio. Now everything I know I get from facebook or twitter, since I don’t even watch the local or world news anymore. I now know all the great events in my life since it all gets posted to facebook and twitter. I no longer have to keep up w/ photos on the conventional photo paper because it’s either in my facebook photo section or it’s in my external hard drive. I am learning to slowly ween myself from facebook, but since I also use facebook from a business aspect, that weening is not going quite so well.

  7. This sounds like a book I need to read. I am definitely hooked on social networking. I really need to take a step back and spend more time living my life!

  8. Anita Leibert says:

    This is very interesting and so true. I honestly wonder what people would do these days after having become so accustomed to using the computer. It does sound like a great book :)

  9. This is a great article! We talk to our kids about not being socially available to their friends without texting or emailing, facebooking, etc. Kids have lost the art of communication. They can’t live without their phones. They can’t go a day without going online, or playing a game on Playstation, etc, while being connected to other players. It drives me crazy!
    But then,
    My husband and I don’t cuddle and watch the local news anymore, winding down the day like we traditionally did for over 10 years. (We go online individually to check the weather and see the local news posts and skip what we don’t want to see or ‘waste’ our time with, watching a half hour show with commercials when we can get all we need in 10 minutes or less.

    WE text our kids in the basement to come up for dinner, instead of that beloved, “dinner’s ready” yell my mom did for the nine of us kids.

    I spend hours at night blog reading and don’t go to bed. (I say because I can’t sleep, and my husband’s snoring won’t allow, but really. I am pretty much addicted to that MOM world out there. I have rather turned attention from the love and friendship of awesome neighbors, even sisters, because we are all sucked up by this kind of world.

    One thing I DO is still talk on the phone…alot. a LOT a LOT! And I get grief for it! I still send letters and cards by hand because it’s more personal then sending an Ecard. But it is so inviting and so less time consuming so I can see how it used so much.

    I do cringe at what the world will become. Classrooms online without the connection with a special teacher, Work situations the same with all done by video conference. Medical appointments handled the same.

    Don’t get me wrong, i have met so many friends online, have been helped to get diagnosed after a 7 year illness BECAUSE I had technology available. Have a connection with so many moms out there… BUT

    I feel we have all become robots, running at fast pace and often lost without a true beating heart. We have lost our courage to face people because we are not often put in that situation anymore. We have lost our thought processes because we are auto pilot. Maybe we ARE lost in OZ and we need to go home? Back being appreciative of our advanced society that does gift us so many new and exciting options. You can never go home, but I feel we must in order to get back to that truly connected society again. The one connected by heart and hand’s on, not computer or tech driven relationships. Just my 2 cents.

  10. Thank you for your blog. It is truly amazing how we can easily become unplugged. I, too, as an adult have become glued to my laptop at times. I do, however, know that I cherish a face-to-face relationship more than a cyber one. I block my daughter from the laptop, computer, iPod, Kindle, and cell phone quite regularly so she will become grounded to family values again. Actually, when I do this, she doesn’t really miss it at all. We continue to have family dinners nightly so we can have sensible conversations at the table. I do plan to get this book and read it as I believe it can help me in many ways to explains some more things to my daughter. Thanks you so very much!

  11. Thank you for your blog. It is truly amazing how we can easily become unplugged. I, too, as an adult have become glued to my laptop at times. I do, however, know that I cherish a face-to-face relationship more than a cyber one. I block my daughter from the laptop, computer, iPod, Kindle, and cell phone quite regularly so she will become grounded to family values again. Actually, when I do this, she doesn’t really miss it at all. We continue to have family dinners nightly so we can have sensible conversations at the table. I do plan to get this book and read it as I believe it can help me in many ways to explains some more things to my daughter.

  12. Alice Abbitt says:

    I like that we are more connected now via social media but feel that it has given some people the freedom to be more crass or rude than they would have been face to face. My rule for socializing online, if you wouldn’t feel comfortable saying something to a person’s face, you don’t need to post it online for everyone to get annoyed with as well.

  13. Lucy Black says:

    That’s so true.

  14. This sounds like a good book. I’ve unplugged from a lot of social media, I spend a lot less time than I used to and I don’t miss it. I also don’t tend to get sucked in when I do get on.
    Stacy recently posted..Where Do You Find Happiness? (The “10 Locations” Exercise)

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge
0 Flares Facebook 0 Pin It Share 0 Twitter 0 StumbleUpon 0 Google+ 0 0 Flares ×